Month: July 2009

Great presentation on content strategy http://www.slideshare.net/chiatlanta/what-is-content-strategy-acs-july-meetup-1731575

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Great interview with Reif Larsen http://www.bookslut.com/features/2009_06_014543.php#

Just came across this great interview with Reif Larsen, author of The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet (one of my favourite books of the year so far) in Bookslut.

 I couldn’t believe that Larsen said he didn’t include the illustrations, map and diagrams until after he’d written the first draft – the seem like such an integral part of the text. 

Rutu Modan ‘Exit Wounds’ Interview

I’ve just finished Rutu Modan’s Exit Wounds. I felt that it ended really abruptly – I had that weird feeling where you turn the page for more and experience the shock of the blank space of the inside of the back cover.
As a reader you come into the story long after it began and you leave before it ends – as you might expect from a comic, this is just a slice of the story, except in this case there’s no preceding or following editions.
It wasn’t a cliffhanger by any means though – the plot is ordinary, but in a good way (if that makes sense!). It narrates one episode from Koby’s (the central character) life – and it seems that there will be great mystery and tragedy, with a soldier secretively revealing that she thinks his father may have been killed in a bombing. The truth as it unfolds, is less dramatic, but full of the emotion of a difficult father-son relationship and all the sadness and secrets there are in every family’s history.
I also admired the way Modan deals with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in Exit Wounds. The conflict shapes the text, it is never explicitly discussed. In this BBC interview, she says ‘It’s in the background, but it’s my life’ and explains that this is ‘a very narrow view of life in Israel’. I found an interesting tension between the political and the everyday in this. I think Joe Sacco, one of my favourite graphic novelists and the author of Palestine, says it better than I can, describing Exit Wounds in Drawn and Quarterly as “a profound, richly textured, humane, and unsentimental look at societal malaise and human relationships and that uneasy place where they sometimes intersect.”